Big Sur, California

2 comments
lifestyle, Modeling, photo, Photography

Going to Big Sur by myself was one of the scariest and best things I’ve ever done. I drove in from the north side of Highway 1 and stopped at Big Sur Deli for a sandwich and Henry Miller Library for some nostalgia. I hiked to McWay Falls, and then back up the hill behind it, where I stood barefoot in a creek of cold water deep in the woods, and regretfully lost my favorite, enamel, “cherokee” printed pin that Eddie O. gave me somewhere in the dirt. After my hike, all I wanted to do was find my camping spot and curl up in my sleeping bag, but I had to look up the address on my phone, and I was completely without service. The only place that I knew I had cell service was back by the Deli, about 12 miles away. So I drove back up there solely to look at my phone, only to realize I needed to drive an hour south, back in the direction I had just come from. The sun was starting to set and I was just hoping I’d get there before dark. I finally reached the spot off Highway 1 and drove onto the bumpiest, hilliest road I’ve ever driven on, and I was only about 40% sure my car would make it. I figured it was very possible for me to roll backwards off this cliff at any moment and never see the world from this plane ever again. And the further I drove, the more confused I became because I didn’t see any campsite. I eventually reached my first sign of human life, a hippie clearly living out of his van, who told me, “Anyone can camp in a national forest for 14 days, and then they have to move at least 30 miles away,” and pointed out where I could find some other camp sites. I drove on, hating every moment of the bumpy road, passing only one other camp site. It was starting to get dark and I hadn’t found any other spot to stay so I turned around to go back to the only place I knew of. That was actually the worst idea I could have had because now the sun was directly in my eyes, and I was very close to driving off a cliff. My windshield was too dirty to see out of, even after I wiped it off twice. I had to lean my head out the window, see how much room I had before I might die, drive a little, stop, repeat, until I got to a shady side of the mountain and back to the camp site. I put my sleeping bag outside and finally got to deeply inhale the sweetest air I’ve ever had the pleasure of breathing. Soon I was covered in a blanket of stars and I remembered why Big Sur feels like home.

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2 thoughts on “Big Sur, California”

  1. jazzy says:

    Big Sur is an awesome place. One can understand why folks in 60’s gravitated there. Great photos. Check out the beach there and the beach at W.R. Hearst State Beach. Just be aware of the clothing optional section at the far end.

  2. tedcoulton says:

    Check out Morro Strand State Beach Campground On Oct 23, 2015 1:07 PM, “Cherokee Neas” wrote:

    > Cherokee posted: “Going to Big Sur by myself was one of the scariest and > best things I’ve ever done. I drove in from the north side of Highway 1 and > stopped at Big Sur Deli for a sandwich and Henry Miller Library for some > nostalgia. I hiked to McWay Falls, and then back up” >

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